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Apple is working on 'indestructible' iPhones and Macbooks

But will it ever match up to the Nokia 3310?

Apple is working on 'indestructible' iPhones and Macbooks

When you shell out thousands of quid for your latest iPhone and Macbook combos, literally the last thing in the world you need is for your shiny new screens to get scuffed, marked and – worst of all – cracked.

And despite the most diligent treatment and the hardiest cases, sometimes damage is just unavoidable.

But, according to a newly-released patent, Apple is now working on technology that would make all of its devices scratchproof and unbendable - the latter a particularly useful asset to have following the iPhone 6 ‘bendgate’ issue in 2014.

According to the patent, Apple is working on an abrasion-resistant finish that can protect the company’s device from wear and tear, Techradarreports.

The patent is called ‘Abrasion-Resistant Surface Finishes On Metal Enclosures’ and it explains that there will be two layers to screens in the future – one lower metallic layer and one harder outer layer coated in either a ceramic material or a carbon-based substance with similar hardness to diamond.

A diagram of the new patented technology 

The outer layer is described as being between 0.5 micrometers to 3 micrometers and the lower layer will measure between 8-30 micrometers.

And the abrasive-resistant coating will reportedly be applied over the paint layer, potentially meaning we could see more colour options in the future for Apple products.

All this sounds pretty promising but there’s one big question on our techy minds: can this new technology ever stand up to the mighty Nokia 3310?

One of the most popular phone handsets ever produced, the Nokia 3310 crashed onto the scene in 2000 and its durability hasn’t ever really been matched. Plus, it had changeable covers! Remember those?

Apple, you’ve still got a lot of work to do to match this telephone titan. 

(Images: Getty / Apple / United States Patent and Trademark Office)