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This is why that photo of Trump at the G7 summit does not look like a renaissance painting

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Dave Fawbert
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Donald Trump G7

If you’re going to invoke art history, make sure you get it right

Being Donald Trump at the moment must be such a laugh. Honestly, think about it. You get invited to all of these high level events, like the G7 summit, that most politicians would give a limb to be involved with. And not only that; you’re there as the head of the biggest, richest, most powerful nation there.

And you basically know nothing. You have no idea what’s going on. But - and this is the best bit - no one can point that out to you. Because you’re the head of the biggest, richest, most powerful nation there. So they all have to be nice to you. Even when you manage to turn up late to the gender equality breakfast.

But the best image from the G7 summit, which brought together world leaders from Germany, Japan, Canada, the US, Italy, France and the UK in Charlevoix, Quebec, in Canada, was undoubtedly the now-iconic photo of him sat down, arms crossed, surrounded by fellow G7 leaders, clearly exasperated with him.

As Trump managed to upset nearly everyone with his stance on tariffs, with an agreed joint communique subsequently being rejected by the US president after he fell out with Canadian PM Justin Trudeau on Twitter (yes, really), one image went viral, as it managed to capture the essence of Trump’s childlike demeanour.

It was taken by the German cabinet’s official photographer Jesco Denze - and it kicked off a worldwide caption competition:

However, it’s only ever a matter of time before someone on the internet comes up with this comment, and it was duly provided by Pete Forester, amongst others:

Of course, there are many examples of this citation; this drunken scene from New Year’s Eve in Manchester in 2016 being one of them:

But, actually, it turns out that, on this occasion at least, it’s not accurate to say that this is akin to a renaissance painting.

Why? Well, German game developer, and art history graduate Palle Hoffstein is on hand to explain.

So there you have it. Next time someone says this on the internet, you can step in and correct them with your superior knowledge.

People absolutely love it when you do that.

(Image: Getty)

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Dave Fawbert

ShortList.com staff writer Dave’s primary passions are pop, prose, punning and power ballads (and alliteration). A lower division football enthusiast and long-suffering cricket fan, he is one of only 110 people followed on Twitter by Chas Hodges from Chas ‘n’ Dave. Follow Dave on Twitter like Chas: @davefawbert

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