News

Eating disorders in men have risen by 70% since 2010

Posted by
Tom Victor
Published

For a long time, there has been a feeling that eating disorders were a thing that don’t happen to men.

This has changed in the recent past, with some of the stigma being removed and men being encouraged to seek treatment, rather than suffering in silence.

However, the extent of it all may still come as a surprise to many.

According to NHS figures published by The Guardian, the number of adult men admitted to hospital with an eating disorder rose by 70% between 2010-11 and 2015-16.

The rate of increase is comparable to women admitted to hospital for similar reasons, while the increase in admissions was higher for men aged 41-60 than for those in younger adult age groups.

Still, male patients still account for only a fraction of the overall total: between 2015 and 2016, 1,098 male adults and children were admitted, compared to 12,054 females.

“We must continue to address the ongoing gender bias around eating disorders so every man who is suffering feels comfortable to get help when they need it,” Dr William Rhys Jones, of the Royal College of Psychiatrists’ eating disorders faculty, is quoted as saying.

“Images of unhealthy male body ideals in the media place unnecessary pressure on vulnerable people who strive for acceptance through the way they look.”

(Image: Pexels)