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The Nazis Were All Massive Meth Heads


We suppose that, had he met him, his surname wouldn't have been the only thing that Adolf Hitler liked about Mr. Walter White.

A sensational new book written by historian Norman Ohler claims that Hitler was high on a heroin-like drug through the Second War, was injected with semen to boost his energy, and plied his soldiers with crystal meth to lift their spirits and power them through the early Blitzkrieg section of the War.

The book, entitled The Total Rush: Drugs in the Third Reich, has been written after Ohler gained access to the medical records of leading Nazis, alongside the private records of Hitler's chief physician, Dr Theodor Morrell. A leading historian, Hans Mommsen has already said that, "This book will change the accepted face of the history of the war."

In the brilliantly-named chapter 'High Hitler', it is claimed that he was on 82 different types of medication, including a drug related to heroin named Eukodal. 

"Hitler loved Eukodal. He used his strong drug that made him euphoric even when reality wasn't looking euphoric at all. The generals kept telling him: 'We need to change our tactics. We need to end this. We are going to lose the war.' And he didn't want to hear it. He had Dr Morell give him the drugs that made him feel invulnerable and on top of the situation."

In 1944, the Nazi leader apparently received an injection of a cocktail of testosterone and semen, taken from the prostate glands of young bulls.

Meanwhile, German troops were given Pervitin, a forerunner of crystal meth, which boosted soldiers to fight for longer and with lower rations; between 1939 and 1945 over 200 million pills had been issued to Nazi fighters.

Ohler writes: "Berlin was a Breaking Bad drug kitchen for Hitler and the Nazis long before the TV show was ever devised... The success in the Blitzkrieg can be attributed to the fact that no-one went to sleep... That soldiers were taking Pervitin was not a secret at all. In the beginning, the army didn't realize Pervitin was a drug; they thought it was just like drinking coffee. But in 1941, it was outlawed and declared an illegal drug. In the army, distribution was then kept under wraps, but the records of the war against Russia aren't as clear as those from the war against France, where we can see how many tablets were distributed. I spoke to a medical officer, who was in Stalingrad, and he said he still issued Pervitin in Stalingrad."

In the private records of Otto Ranke, a military doctor and director of the Institute for General and Defence Physiology at Berlin's Academy of Military Medicine, he wrote: "I decided to give them Pervitin as they began to lie down in the snow wanting to die. After half an hour the men began spontaneously reporting that they felt better. They began marching in orderly fashion again, their spirits improved, and they became more alert."

[via Daily Mirror]

(Images: Rex/AllStar)



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