News

Your name and face shape could determine how likeable you are

Posted by
Emily Reynolds
Published

How likeable you are is generally considered to be down to a complex range of things – how often you get a round in, for example, or how often you screenshot incriminating Snapchat Stories.

But there might actually be an easier way of working out how likeable you are – and it’s all down to how you look and what your name is.

In a technique outlined by Ben Ambridge in the Guardian, assigning numbers to the letters in your name and your face could give you a good indication of how other people see you. 

The technique is as follows:

  • If your face is angular, give yourself 3 points; if it’s round give yourself 1. If it’s somewhere inbetween give yourself 2. 
  • You then measure your name by scoring points according to the following vowels: a = 2, e = 3, i = 3, o = 1, u = 1.  You then “take the average” of this score –if your name was ‘Samuel’, for example ([a = 2 + e = 3 + u = 1] ÷ 3), would have a score of 2.
  • Next, you subtract the smaller number from the larger – if your face is angular (3) and your name score was 2, your overall score would be 1. 
  • The closer to zero the number is? The more likeable you are.

It’s all down to the way we perceive certain words, apparently –  the so-called ‘bouba/kiki effect’. In studies, participants were found to consistently pair the nonsense word ‘bouba’ with drawings of round objects or shapes; ‘kiki’ was, similarly, paired with ‘spiky’ or angular drawings. More recently, a study from the University of Otago in New Zealand found that people who have a ‘round’ sounding name and a round face are seen as far more likeable. 

In other words, we perceive certain sounds to have ‘shapes’ or forms – so if your name ‘matches’ your appearance, you’re perceived to be more likeable than someone whose name fails to match the way they look. If your name is Tom and you have a round face? You’re probably pretty likeable.

Same face and called ‘Jim’? Bad luck, mate. 

Topics

Share this article

Author

Emily Reynolds

Other people read

More from News

More from Emily Reynolds