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This is how Donald Trump's 's***hole' comment was translated around the world

Posted by
Dave Fawbert
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Donald Trump shithole

The entrance of Donald Trump into politics has tested the media in ways they could never have imagined just two and half years ago.

Having thought that the two end-points of the pendulum were the simplistic ways of George Dubya, and the poetic, intelligent speeches of Barack Obama, journalists had become used to operating in a certain way, and tailored their reactions to events accordingly.

However - as you may have spotted yourself - along came Donald J. Trump to set a bomb off under the whole thing, with journalists struggling to work out how on earth to deal with his unusual style which, when written down, often made very little sense, his constant, easily-disprovable lying, and his own repeated attacks on their work as ‘fake news’. 

Not only this, journalists have had to deal with the blow to their egos which came from their triumphant fact-checking and righteous condemnations of the Donald being roundly ignored by the American public, which voted him in anyway despite - or perhaps because of - their preaching.

In the year since he came to power, he has shattered all journalistic conventions, and the media has struggled to cope - even now, every time you think that the bar has been lowered, it gets winched down an extra inch or two with the latest scarely believable outburst from the presidential Twitter account.

And it’s not just the content of the missives: it’s the distinct unpresidential language used. How exactly to report, on mainstream media channels, that the president has boasted of grabbing women by the pussy? What about calling an NFL anthem protester a ‘son of a bitch’? And now Trump, apparently referring to Haiti and African countries, saying: “Why do we want all these people from ‘shithole countries’ coming here?”

Some outlets decided to censor shithole, some didn’t. But it also presented a peculiar problem for non-English speaking media: how on earth to translate this remark?

Well, in a hilarious fashion, it turns out.

Barren Mountains and Evil Waters is quite poetic isn’t it?

Maybe we all underestimated Trump: he’s practically Wordsworth.

(Image: Rex)