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The ‘Oh Jeremy Corbyn’ chant has increased streams of ‘Seven Nation Army’ by 16,893%

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Emily Reynolds
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You have heard it on the beaches and on the landing grounds. You have heard it in the fields and in the streets. You have heard it in the hills. You know, that “Oh Jeremy Corbyn” chant.

And other than reflecting a newfound optimism in British politics, it seems like the chant – which has been everywhere from pub gardens to football grounds to Glastonbury – has its uses. At least, quite specifically, for the White Stripes’ streaming stats. According to streaming platform Deezer, streams of ‘Seven Nation Army’ by the White Stripes, which the chant is based on, have been boosted by over 16,000% since it hit the mainstream. (16,893%, if you’re being precise).

If, by some bizarre fluke, you haven’t come across the chant, it sounds a bit like this:

Dom Wallace, Deezer’s music editor, puts some of the popularity down to Corbyn’s appearance at Glastobury, which he says had a “major impact” on what people choose to listen to.

“But we didn’t expect Jeremy Corbyn’s appearance to have such an influence on streams,” he said. “It seems Jack White owes Jeremy Corbyn a pint or two!”

If you were hoping to take the chant to other cultural events, however, you might end up disappointed – because it’s been banned at Wimbledon. The club are concerned about an “outbreak of Corbynism”, which seems like a mild overreaction to a 68-year-old socialist with his own allotment.

The All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club, where Wimbledon is held each year, has stated that “no political slogans” are to be allowed at this year’s championship – and that includes any Corbyn based T-shirts, too.

“We wouldn’t want people to use this kind of event as a platform for their specific views or causes,” an AELTC spokesperson said.

Absolute killjoys.