News

The Glider

Designed by Brian Voakes, paper plane expert

Design: “The most important thing about folding a paper plane is to get nice sharp edges. If you can, use a ruler edge or thumbnail – so that you think you’re almost going to tear it in half. A soft fold will not fly.”

Attributes: “Often, the dihedral, which is the upward angle of the wings to the body of the plane, determines the climbing or the diving. So you’ll need to make sure both wings are angled in the exact same way, otherwise your plane could end up flying around in circles because one wing is slightly higher.”

ShortList test flight result: “This glider needs a gentle release so its large wing-span can catch wind,” says Brian. As such, this one takes a bit of time and patience, but if you the sharp edges right it’s worth neglecting an afternoon’s work for it.

Style: “An animated traditional aviation pattern with stars to inspire you to reach for them.”

100 Paper Planes to Fold & Fly, designed by Brian Voakes and published by Usborne, is out now

You'll need to cut off the white trimmings from the outside of this design

You can download it here:

Topics

Share this article

Related Posts