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If you can survive this interview you can get the best job ever

Don’t feel like your current job is tough enough? Constantly look for ways to inject danger into your 9-to-5? Blindly CC the entire company into every email thread you’re in? Sometimes fill the teas up to the brim of the mug and insist on carrying all six of them at once for added jeopardy? You’re in the wrong line of work, pal. Get yourself a new job. A challenging job. How about the Director of Toughness?

Columbia (the sportswear company with a ‘u’ and not the country with a double ‘o’) are hiring two new Directors of Toughness. What does directing the tough entail, you ask? You’ll be spending nine months roaming the planet, wearing Columbia gear and testing to see if it endures extreme conditions or falls apart and leaves you to die. You are the crash test dummies and as such you’ll have the opportunity to put them through their paces in “the most inclement weather and harshest terrain."

There are many people out there who will read this job description and head straight back to LinkedIn. This job isn’t for them. They can barely work a thermos without shooting hot soup straight into their eye, let alone straddle a canyon on a rope bridge while taming a bear. This is the dream job for the sort of person whose idea of a fun morning is waking up to the furnace blast heat of an arid desert or else putting their foot through some thin ice and possibly having to amputate before frostbite sets in.

If you’ve read this far and still think “Yes please!”, you’ll want to register online after 3 October. Then, if you wow the panel with your extreme application, you’ll be invited to interview in the extremely remote and not-a-convenient-Megabus-ride-away location of the Isle of Skye, where you’ll be put through your paces further.

Last year’s Directors of Toughness scaled the summit of Ecuador’s Cayambe volcano via the Arctic coast of Manitoba, saw a bunch of other incredible vista, and crucially, didn’t die. This year it could be you in the wild, experiencing the majesty of nature, and, yeah, not dying.