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You can see the ‘Beaver Moon’ in the sky tonight – here’s why it has that name

Posted by
Tom Victor
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moon-sky

In case you hadn’t noticed, we’re very much in the midst of autumn. At times an unseasonably warm autumn, but autumn all the same.

Around this time last year, that meant we got to see a Supermoon, which is like a regular moon that works for a newspaper and wears glasses to remain undetected during the day.

This year, though – and more specifically, this weekend – we’ll be treated to a ‘Beaver Moon’.

Yes, a Beaver Moon. You’re probably wondering why it’s called that.

london-supermoon

The moon, pretending to be the sun

First, the specifics: the Beaver Moon is slightly larger and a whole lot brighter than your run-of-the-mill full moons (or appears that way) because the satellite is a little nearer to the earth.

As for the name, it’s thought to have been coined by Native Americans, as the Beaver Moon traditionally occurs around November - the time of year they began laying beaver traps to catch the animals for their fur.

And due to both the size of the moon and the weather forecast, you ought to be able to get a glimpse of it relatively easily.

The ‘Beaver Moon’ is in the sky tonight – here’s why it’s called that

Show off

The best time to catch a glimpse of something like the Beaver Moon is around midnight, the Huffington Post quotes Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomer Tom Kerss as saying.

However, if you’re wondering when it is likely to reach it’s fullest, that’s not until a little before 5:30 tomorrow morning.

So, if you’re out tonight, maybe give staring at the ground on your way home a bit of a swerve for once, and check out that big bright thing above you.

(Images: Pedro Lastra/iStock)