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1931 Bugatti Type 54 expected to fetch £3 million

If we were offered a car that had no seat belts, heating, wipers or even a roof, we'd be out the door quicker than you can say Swiss Toni.

But then again, if it was this exceptional Bugatti Type 54 we might be persuaded to consider it.

Worth £3m, the winning car from 1931 is set to become one of the most expensive racing cars in the world when auctioned by Bonhams on 7th February.

The car won the 1931 Grand Prix at Monza in its first season and is one of only a handful of racing Bugatti's left in private hands, hence its astronomical asking price.

The 'Unlimited' 5 litre, 8 cylinder monster propelled its driver at speeds up to 160 mph around the rudimentary circuits of the day.

At that time drivers didn'’t wear a seatbelt as the theory was you were most likely to survive a crash if thrown clear of the wreckage. However, its owner, Czech Prince Georg Lobkowicz, wasn'’t so lucky and was killed while racing the car in 1932.

(Image: Rex Features)