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The Large Hadron Collider Might Be About To Find A Parallel Universe

interstellar.jpg

How do you top the discovery of the 'God Particle'? Finding evidence of a parallel universe ought to do it.

Physicists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Cern, Geneva, are currently analysing data that the atom-smashing device has been producing since June - when it was finally kicked up to 'full power'.

It's hoped that the data will show energy slipping in and out of existence, which will provide proof of miniature blackholes opening up to parallel dimensions within the LHC.

But don't worry, they're not about to open up a portal to a world where the dinosaurs still rule the planet. It's a lot more... scientific than that. Although that would undoubtedly be awesome.

Here's a simplified (but still slightly confusing) explanation of the whole thing:

"Just as many parallel sheets of paper, which [which could be viewed] as two dimensional objects (breadth and length) can exist in a third dimension (height), parallel universes can also exist in higher dimensions" said Cern employee Mir Faizal from the University of Waterloo.

"We predict that gravity can leak into extra dimensions, and if it does, then miniature black holes can be produced at the LHC."

Cern

"Normally, when people think of the multiverse, they think of the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics, where every possibility is actualised. This cannot be tested and so it is philosophy and not science," added Faizal, disappointing all of us in one fell swoop. "This is not what we mean by parallel universes. What we mean is real universes in extra dimensions."

We feel it's important to mention that whilst Faizal is being a bit of a killjoy here, he didn't really rule out amazing parallel worlds with dinosaurs and talking monkeys, and that's the key takeaway here. 

If you want to find out more about how gravity might be able to leak between extra dimensions that exist beyond our understanding of space and time, best watch Interstellar. Like, five times. And then read up on the theory of gravity's rainbow.

And then drop us an email explaining it to us? Thanks.

[Via: ZME Science]

(Images: Cern)

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