Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation
Top

Facebook is in trouble for snooping on people who aren't members

facebookprivacy.jpg

France doesn't 'Like' Facebook right now. 

The data protection body of the French government has given the US social giant three months to stop tracking non-members without their consent - a legal move that's drawn attention to Facebook's clandestine cookies activity.

Following a similar move by the Belgian Privacy Commissioner in December 2015, France's data protection authority isn't happy with the manner in which Facebook tracks people who visit the site. 

At present, if you click on a link to a Facebook article, the social site will install a cookie on your browser regardless of whether you're signed into the network. As such, Facebook can then track your web habits for financial gains without you even being a member - a move that the French believe doesn't fit its current privacy laws. The French are demanding that Facebook stops tracking non-members in this fashion within three months, or face serious fines. 

"Protecting the privacy of the people who use Facebook is at the heart of everything we do," a Facebook spokeswoman told Reuters. "We... look forward to engaging with the CNIL [French data protection authority - Commission Nationale de l'Informatique et des Libertes] to respond to their concerns."

It's been known that Facebook tracks non-members in this fashion for a number of months, but recent changes in international data laws has allowed the French to take legal action. The CNIL also demand that Facebook increase the required number of characters in its passwords from six characters to eight, to heighten security, and to cease sending personal data of French members to its team in the US.

Facebook's recent adjustments to its privacy and cookies policies has seen a number of European authorities begin similar investigations: in addition to the French and the Belgians, the Dutch, German and Spanish are currently investigating the social media giant's activities to see if they comply with privacy laws.

And the UK? We're apparently okay with it.

[Via: BBC]

Related

chess2.jpg

Did you know you can play chess in Facebook Messenger?

shutterstock_181909379.jpg

Delete this app to majorly boost your Android phone's battery life

shutterstock_294583748.jpg

These are the sort of Facebook posts everyone hates the most

Comments

More

Android users can finally play Super Mario Run - and definitely should

Extended toilet breaks for everyone

by Matt Tate
23 Mar 2017

Apple have released a red iPhone and that is very important

And not just because it's red

by Gary Ogden
21 Mar 2017

Amazon's new Alexa update means it can bring you beer in two hours

"Alexa, we're going to need more booze"

by Matt Tate
21 Mar 2017

Forget traffic jams with this SUV that can drive over cars

Why has it taken so long to invent this?

by Dave Fawbert
21 Mar 2017

Zelda megafan controls his smart home with an ocarina

Pointless? Possibly. Are we envious? Definitely

by Matt Tate
20 Mar 2017

Soon you'll be able to steal your mate's phone battery to charge your

"Oh come on, mate, I've only got 4%"

by Gary Ogden
17 Mar 2017

How to cheat your way to victory in 'Mario Kart 64'

Anyone fancy digging the old N64 out again?

by Matt Tate
17 Mar 2017

5 new(ish) mobile games guaranteed to make any commute bearable

It doesn't have to be this painful

by Matt Tate
16 Mar 2017

This terrifying gadget allows you to make private calls in public

Be like Bane

by Gary Ogden
15 Mar 2017

You'll soon be able to pay for your shopping with your sunglasses

I'm still not happy until I can pay with my underwear

by Gary Ogden
15 Mar 2017