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Shark eats shark

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As you'll be well aware, sharks are very open-minded when it comes to their cuisine.

Unlike some of the world's pickier creatures, sharks will pretty much eat anything. Including you.

But, this is something rather new. Hands up if you've ever seen a shark eating another shark before. What, no-one? Apparently it's happened before but this is the first time we've seen it captured on film.

To get all specific and that, it's a tasselled wobbegong shark eating a brown-banded bamboo shark. The scene was discovered by the still-intact researchers from Australian Research Council's Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies. It's a process that apparently takes hours, due to the size of the shark being ingested.

Anything that gets them off our backs is fine with us...

(Image: Tom Mannering)

[via Springer Link]

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