Jump to Main ContentJump to Primary Navigation

How to jug a hare


Sorry but summer is over. It's depressing but true.

You'll have to bury that barbecue for another year and modify your meals to something a little bit more autumnal. Which is why you really should learn how to jug a hare.

We spoke to James Lyon-Shaw, executive chef at The Jugged Hare, who shared his tips on one of the more under-appreciated culinary processes.

Serves: 8 -10


8 hare hind legs

1ltr red wine

4 juniper berries, chopped

1 bay leaf

A few sprigs of thyme

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1tbsp flour, plus extra for dusting

Vegetable oil, for frying

1 onion, finely chopped

50g butter

1tbsp tomato purée

3 litres beef stock

300ml hare blood (ask your butcher to reserve this for you when he butchers the hare)


1) Cut the hare legs in half at the joint and then cut them once more through the middle of the thigh, so you end up with 3 pieces from each leg.

2) Put the pieces into a non-reactive bowl or dish, together with the red wine, juniper berries, bay leaf and thyme. Cover with clingfilm and refrigerate for 24-48 hours.

3) Drain the hare in a colander over a bowl and pat the pieces dry with some kitchen paper.

4) Season the pieces of hare and lightly flour them, dusting off any excess.

5) Heat the vegetable oil in a heavy frying pan and fry the pieces, a few at a time, until well-coloured, then put to one side on a plate.

6) Meanwhile, in a heavy-based saucepan, gently cook the onion in the butter for 3-4 minutes until soft.

7) Add the tablespoon of flour and stir well over a medium heat until it begins to turn a sandy colour. Add the tomato purée, then slowly add the red wine and herbs from the marinade, stirring well to avoid lumps forming. Bring to the boil and simmer over a medium heat until the liquid has reduced to half the volume.

8) Add the beef stock and hare, bring back to the boil, cover and simmer gently for 1 hour (or you can cook this in an oven that has been preheated to 160C/gas mark 3).

9) Remove a piece of meat to check if it's tender; if not, continue cooking for another 30 minutes or so.

10) Once the meat is tender, remove all the pieces of meat from the sauce and set aside.

11) Add the blood and continue to simmer the sauce until it has thickened to a gravy-like consistency, then return the pieces of meat to warm through until it's ready to serve. Adjust the seasoning if necessary.



How to make roast grouse

615x330_Cow Pie.jpg

Make the perfect pie


How to cook the perfect roast beef



The ultimate album and beer pairing guide

How brews were meant to be enjoyed

29 Sep 2016

8 beers to blow your head off

Eight high-end, high-powered brews. Forget your troubles the classy way

by Andrew Dickens
28 Sep 2016

Netflix and chilled: a show and beer pairing guide

Stick these in the fridge before your next binge session

19 Sep 2016

25 things we'd like to see banned in pubs immediately

Music during the football? Get in the sea

by Paddy Maddison
15 Sep 2016

Nearly lethal coffee has 80 times more caffeine than regular cup

This will keep you wired for 18 hours

by Joe Ellison
06 Sep 2016

AMA reveals the ingredients you should definitely dodge at Subway

Your dream footlong may be about to change

by Chris Sayer
02 Sep 2016

Show your boss this article and get free pizza this lunchtime

Worth a shot, right?

by Chris Sayer
01 Sep 2016

In London? You seriously need to try these cocktails right now

19 Aug 2016

Best late night bars and clubs near the Night Tube

Prepare yourself for a night out out

by David Cornish
18 Aug 2016