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Diversify your training

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We were invited down to Marble Arch to take part in the Reebok Human Delta event to mark the sports brand’s new logo.

Turning up to the grassy square at the edge of Hyde Park, in the middle of bustling central London, there is a sea of red Reebok T-shirts, each containing an excitable person gearing themselves up for the ensuing fitness extravaganza due to take place on three huge lino mats evoking the shape of the new Reebok delta logo.

Split into three teams, we each assembled on our assigned mat for our respective workouts; one group went Spartan, one group did CrossFit and the other undertook some Les Mills Body Combat, led by some insanely energetic instructors. The reason for the workouts – in addition to the cool shots of an energetic, sweaty human-covered delta they would produce – is to reinforce the fact that Reebok, unlike most other sports brands, is eschewing the celebrity or sportsman-endorsed route of gaining notoriety, and is focusing on exercise instead – that, after all, is what its products are for.

The brand has specialised products on offer for each of the featured exercises – from footwear to performance board shorts – and they all boast huge benefits to supplement triathlon training. Spartan coaching has been born of the infamous Spartan races, which team distance running with a series of intensive, and often very muddy, obstacles to tackle along the way. It’s a great one to up your endurance, help you tackle the various activities in a triathlon, not to mention get you used to that chilly open water swim.

Conversely, CrossFit has a focus on high intensity cardio bursts and heavy weight reps to build muscle and strength, which in turn will help you power through a triathlon course. And finally Les Mills is a great way to up your cardio capacity – there are several classes to choose from to suit various interests and abilities, including the likes of Body Attack and Body Combat, teaming high intensity aerobics and cardio with body conditioning and core work.

The key with each of these workouts is the group element, which, when combined with the high energy music, makes for a much more enjoyable (and addictive) workout environment – great for breaking up those lonely swim practices.

See @ShortListTri for regular updates

Words: Danielle Richardson

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